About your Search

20130101
20130131
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the political cliche of low-hanging fruit is something so cartoonishly insensitive, so cartoonishly villainous, you then bring upon us a second political cliche. you have jumped the shark. blocking voluntary efforts by people to get rid of their own guns because they want to voluntarily? that is an exercise in shark jumping. this is the sort of thing that might make sense internally to the nra when they talk about this amongst themselves, but the rest of the country are not picking a fight, but looking for problem solving, nonconfrontational ways to help each other out. trying to block the voluntary tucson gun buyback program does not make sense. the whole reason gun policy is supposed to be seen as so intractable, so unreformable, so politically untouchable and not in america is that the national rifle association has created a mystique about themselves, a mystique about their own power that is supposed to caution anyone who might want to reform gun laws that it just cannot be done. no matter who we are, no matter where we live, no matter how or why we might want to reform our gun laws, no ma
cliches. the republican party wants to stop this government, blame them. will that work its way into the news coverage? will the people begin to buy the president's shaping of the battlefield? >> it seems like that has happened every time. that the republicans get more of the blame when we have these sorts of, you know, end of the night deals that have to get made, because they have been doing a bit of foot-dragging. so he is definitely laying down the rhetoric. i think one of the things he said in the press conference, which i think people will resonate with, which is this whole idea, if you go out and buy an expensive bill, when the check comes, you can't refuse to buy the bill. he is likening that to refuse tolerate the debt limit. it resonates with people and they can understand the debate in their own language in some ways. >> just to check, glenn, do you think people in the tea party think that they're paying the bill or not paying the bill, or do you think they're saying yes or no to spending, the way they look at it? >> oh, yeah. i think what they think is they're lookin
's a failure to pay bills, don't look at both sides. none of the malarkey and cliches. will that work its way into news coverage? will people begin to buy the president's shaping of the battlefield? >> well, it seems like that has happened every time. that republicans get more of the blame when we have these sorts of, you know, end of the night deals that have to get made. because they have been doing a bit of foot dragging. so he definitely is laying down the rhetoric. i think one of the things he said in that process conference which i think people will resonate with which is this idea if you go out and buy an expensive meal, you can't when the check comes refuse to pay the bill. he a likening that to a refusal to raise the debt ceiling. it resonates to people who can understand the debate in their own language in some ways. >> glenn, do you think the people in the tea party are paying the bill or not paying the bill or saying yes to spending? the way they look at it. >> i think what they think is they're looking at a different set of polls that say a significant portion of the electorate c
and keeping their powder dry if i can cram some cliches in there. it's unusual to do an interview when you're awaiting confirmation. you're supposed to do an immediate blackout. he chose his hometown newspaper to do it. while do we care about this as a political story, will he be confirmed or not? everybody thinks in the end he will be. senator schumer is key here. a democratic nominee who doesn't have a scandal or personal scandal, all about policy, very rare to beat somebody just on policy, particularly if it stays an inside game. are there people in washington, in elite circles who want to stop hagel? absolutely. is the public engage on this? no way, not now. the challenge for the people who oppose is to do one of two things, either get the public engaged and say we want to stop chuck hagel, unlikely or pick off a prominent democratic senator who says i can't support this person. schumer is the key. if schumer supports hagel, almost impossible to stop him. >> i have to say, not to -- i feel like this is all - all -- especially the extreme opposition here, it's kind of a waste of time. t
the border is secure. that is very, very important. and the devil is, to use a cliche, in the details there. also goes for how they detyfine path to citizenship. >> jessica, you're getting some new information about the white house, the president is planning to propose, maybe as early as tomorrow, when he's in las vegas. >> the difference between the president's plan and what the senate has proposed is the path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants who are here illegally. the senate plan, as you've explained, would require essentially officials verify that the u.s. border is secure before any of the immigrants, these immigrants can begin signing up for citizenship. the president's proposal would include no similar border security trigger, if you will. now, to help the president press his case, beginning next week, a grassroots coalition that the white house has actually been working with for months dating back to the president's -- the type the president was campaigning for re-election. the coalition will begin a campaign next week that's called bibles, badges and business. it's a gr
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)